Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel

Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel Liquid Fire by Joris Van de Moortel

Limited edition of 13 unique neon lights, transformer, steel hook, guitar case, photo.

 

Liquid Fire, 2016 is a series of neons inspired by the personal guitar collection of Belgian artist Joris Van de Moortel. The edition was launched with a live performance during Middelheim Art Festival. 

 

"What attracts me about electric guitars is that the essence of their being is their sound, coming from the pick-ups. Their shape only serves playing comfort. When you play, steel strings are vibrating and these waves are picked up by the pick-ups, basically magnets and copper wire. The waves disturb the magnetic field, which transfers into electricity. Electricity that turns into music: sent by a cable to an amplifier, which translates the electric waves into sound. So you’re making electricity but you can’t see it, only hear it. When you work with neon, bending the glass tubes by heating and blowing through, adding mercury and gas, and finally close the circuit, you’ll end up with a neon tube. Adding electricity to it, in High Voltage, is essential, and you can see it running through, in a constant loop circuit. You visualise electricity in a way, and even color it, similar to the way you create tone colors on a guitar, at least that’s how I see it.“ - Joris Van de Moortel

  

Nate Lights' Artist Editions is curated by Ben Van den Berghe. 

 

read more about Joris Van de Moortel

Joris Van de Moortel (*1983 in Oostakker) lives and works in Hoboken.
Embodying the fervent spirit of concrete music and rock ‘n roll, Van de Moortel’s process driven work encompasses sculpture, painting, performance, video, books, music, to explore the tension between the static nature of objects and their potential for energy. Hanging at the precipice of “doing” and “undoing” - through planned accidents and improvisation – he transfigures objects, stripping them of their original eruptive musical function and meaning to give rise to new forms.
After graduating at the HISK in Ghent and Künstelerhaus Bethanien in Berlin, his works have been exhibited in various international institutions, including SCAD Museum of Art Atlanta in Georgia, Palais de Tokyo in Paris, the Centraal Museum in Utrecht, Palais des Beaux Arts in Brussels, the Fondation Boghossian – Villa Empain in Brussels, Ludwig Mùzeum in Budapest, the Musée Sainte-Croix in Poitiers and the Maison des Arts in Malakoff.
Upcoming shows in 2016 are at Mac’s Museum of Grand Hornu in Mons and at Krinzinger Projecte in Vienna. 

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