Triedro pendant by Joe Colombo

Triedro pendant by Joe Colombo Triedro pendant by Joe Colombo Triedro pendant by Joe Colombo Triedro pendant by Joe Colombo Triedro pendant by Joe Colombo Triedro pendant by Joe Colombo

Enameled sheet metal reflector with plastic and enameled metal fittings. 

 

“Habits change, the interior of rooms has to change with them.”

– Joe Colombo

 

Joe (Cesare) Colombo, one of Italy's most renowned industrial designers, created this practical delight for Stilnovo in 1970. Stilnovo was the perfect manufacturer for progressive designers like Colombo, who saw innovation and experiment as a priority. More than just designing objects, he developed 'living systems', that had multiple purposes and often provided an elegant storage solution in limited spaces. His aesthetics were built on the idea that “we will have to make the home live for us, for our needs, for a new way of living more consistent with the reality of today and tomorrow.”

 

The Triedro fits wonderfully into his idea to create environments for the future, with designs that adapt to any spatial situation. For the creation of the Triedro, intended for both home and office use, Colombo found inpiration in the reflectors used on lights by photographers to manually adjust the atmosphere in their studio. Stilnovo also manufactured variations of this dynamic light object such as a floor, clamp and a wall lamp.

 

read more about Joe (Cesare)Colombo

Joe (Cesare) Colombo, a prolific Italian industrial designer, was born in 1930. He blew an innovative wind through the world of mass production with many realizations in commercial furnitures and appliances. Until 1949 Colombo studied painting at the Academy of Fine Arts followed by architectural studies at the Polytechnic University in Milan. He gave up his career as a painter and sculptor to concentrate on design, a sacrifice that wasn't made in vain. He created some real iconic pieces in the history of furniture design, like his chair ‘no. 4801’, the ‘Elda chair’ and a portable storage system. Together with his brother Gianni, an acclaimed optical artist, he developed the idea of prismatic lights, which resulted in the Acrilica lamp (1962), a design that earned the Colombo brothers a gold medal at the Milan Triennale in 1964. Later on, Joe Colombo also received a Compasso d'Oro and an A.I.D. International design award for his Spider lighting system (1965).

 

Because of the availability of a wide range of new materials and technologies, the 60s and early 70s were a golden time for designers. Among them Colombo was certainly one of the most progressive, applying these new opportunities to equally new and refreshing ideas. More than just designing objects, he developed 'living systems', that had multiple purposes and often provided an elegant storage solution in limited spaces. His aesthetics were built on the idea that “we will have to make the home live for us, for our needs, for a new way of living more consistent with the reality of today and tomorrow.” A good example of these “dynamic pieces of furniture” were the 1963 “Mini-kitchen” and the 1971 “Total Furnishing Unit”, presented at the seminal 1972 at the Moma in New York or his ‘no. Kd29’ table light, which incorporates an ABS tray for holding pens and other items. Despite his short career - Joe Colombo died young on his 41st birthday – he left an impressive design heritage and remains an inexhaustible source of inspiration.  

Price


Height 24 cm Width 27 cm
Depth 27 cm

AvailableSOLD

 

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